EA gender pay gap ‘much lower’ than UK average, data shows

The Environment Agency’s gender pay gap is much lower than the overall UK gender pay gap, transparency data reveals

Female Environment Agency officers talking to school teacher. Photograph: Environment Agency
EA: on average more male employees occupy higher paid roles than female employees. Photograph: Environment Agency

The Environment Agency’s gender pay gap is much lower than the overall UK gender pay gap, according to new transparency data published by the body.

The data for 2017 shows that within the Environment Agency on average more male employees occupy higher paid roles than female employees, but that the gender pay gap is significantly lower than the figure for the whole of the UK.

According to the figures, published on 16 January, the agency’s gender pay gap is 3%, compared to a figure of 18% for the UK-wide median gender pay gap.

The agency says that its gender pay gap is “relatively low” because “we have a higher proportion of men than women in both higher paid and lower paid roles”.

However, the agency points out that its own figures and the figures for the UK’s gender pay gap are not directly comparable.

The agency says it calculates its pay gap using a method set by The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties and Public Authorities) Regulations 2017, while the Office for National Statistics uses a different method for calculating the UK-wide pay gap.

The EA’s figures also show that more women than men received a bonus payment, but on average women received smaller bonuses than men.

“This is because most bonuses are a proportion of basic pay and on average this is lower for women than men,” the report says. “The basic pay is lower because they are slightly more likely to be in lower paid jobs and they are more likely to work part time.”

The figures also show that the EA’s disability pay gap (5%) is lower than the UK-average figure of 14%.

The EA says that its pay gap for other characteristics – race, religion and belief and sexual orientation – is similar to its gender pay gap, but it says that data is not available to enable it to make a comparison with UK-wide pay gaps for these characteristics.

The agency says it has increased its proportion of women in senior leadership positions by 10% over the past five years.

In a tweet yesterday, EA chair Emma Howard Boyd said that the figures showed “many positive outcomes”, but added there is “still more work to be done to make sure we have a truly diverse and equal workforce”.

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