Global treaty on mercury formally adopted

The treaty introduces binding controls on use and emissions, but it will not enter force until it has been ratified by 50 countries - something that could take years

The UN treaty on mercury controls agreed in January has been officially adopted at a meeting in Japan, but it will not enter force until it has been ratified by 50 countries.

The treaty, known as the Minamata convention, introduces binding controls on mercury mining, use and emissions, and bans mercury from a range of products by 2020. These include fluorescent lighting and blood pressure monitors, and most batteries.

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