Natural England: hen harrier deaths ‘abnormally high’ on grouse moors

Young hen harriers are ten times more likely to die in or near areas covered by grouse moor than elsewhere in the UK, a Natural England survey has confirmed.

Of the 58 hen harriers tagged by the nature regulator, 72% are thought to have been illegally killed over the study’s ten-year duration. While the species, one of the UK’s rarest birds, enjoys legal protection, there have been multiple reports of hen harriers disappearing near land managed for driven grouse shooting.

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Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (c.69)

In force/
Current
Legislation
England, Scotland, Wales
Published
08 May 2018

Commentary

06/02/2013 The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedules A1 and 1A) (Scotland) Order 2013 (SI 2013/31) published, adding species to Schedules 1A and A1., 23/04/2015 Amending Regulations (SI 2015/1180) published.
07/07/2015 Amending Act (Planning (Wales) Act 2015) published.
09/02/2016 Amending Regulations (SI 2016/127) published.
01/05/2018 Amending Act ( Forestry and Land Management (Scotland) Act 2018) published., 19/03/2019 Amending Regulations ( SI 2019/579) published.

Characteristics

Subject

Land and development Wildlife and conservation

Source

OPSI (Office of Public Sector Information)

Affected Sectors

Cross-sector Agriculture Animal Boarding and Pest Control Fishing and aquaculture Forestry Construction Conservation Land Management and Landscaping
ECM

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (c.69)

Document Status: In force/Current

Scope: England, Scotland, Wales

Commentary:

06/02/2013 The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Variation of Schedules A1 and 1A) (Scotland) Order 2013 (SI 2013/31) published, adding species to Schedules 1A and A1., 23/04/2015 Amending Regulations (SI 2015/1180) published.
07/07/2015 Amending Act (Planning (Wales) Act 2015) published.
09/02/2016 Amending Regulations (SI 2016/127) published.
01/05/2018 Amending Act ( Forestry and Land Management (Scotland) Act 2018) published., 19/03/2019 Amending Regulations ( SI 2019/579) published.

Only four birds were found with direct evidence of illegal killing, with 38 simply disappearing, the study notes. “Despite the lack of physical evidence, this strongly suggests destruction of the tag and removal of the carcass,” the authors say. “We conclude that illegal killing is the most parsimonious explanation for the fate of these birds.”

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